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Uncommon Sense (for Software)

This blog has been moved to www.UncommonSenseForSoftware.com.

Tuesday, December 13, 2005

A Quick Recap

My brain will soon be in holiday mode so rather than a whole article this week, we get a "flashback episode" of sorts.

I started this Blog in September 2005 just to give it a whirl. So far, over 2,000 unique visitors have stopped by and the list is growing. A few of you even keep coming back, so thank-you for that.

I believe very strongly that the way we all produce software needs some work. I believe that we as an industry need to get better at predicting when we'll ship our products and without falling back on sacrificing quality to hit some arbitrary date just so that we can say we hit the date.

I also believe very strongly that the general purpose project management approach doesn't cut it for software projects, which are by nature extremely complex. We need to focus on the things that are tripping us up specifically in software projects if we're going to crack this nut.

Here are some past articles in case you haven't seen them yet. Also, check out Devshop.com and put your e-mail address on file if you'd like to be notified when my product ships in the new year.

See you in 2006!

Craig.


Past articles:

Trick Question: Could You Manage a Space Shuttle Launch? This one is about how we intuitively know that domain specific experience counts, but haven't quite built that into project management methodology yet.

Customers don't buy "solutions", they buy products and services. May the best products and services win. Some thoughts contradicting the "solution selling" style. It's not for everyone.

If you get 1 thing right in your application, make it the User Interface. The importance of "look and feel" to your customers and your revenue.

More General Purpose Project Management Theology Isn't Helping Matters! A mild rant.

Keeping it simple. A point about focusing on the right things and forgetting the noise.

The Cost of Late Software. Do you know how much this costs your company? It's big.

Building Front-to-Back The benefits you can achieve by building your User Interface and getting approval on it before building out the back-end.

How to Explain Good Architecture to the Non-techie. It's more about operational effectiveness than anything.

A Trend Can Kill You. Hiccups aren't usually one-offs. They can often indicate trends you should be watching.

The Software Wasn't Late, It Was Supposed to Take That Long. The difference between really "late" software, and software that was estimated wrong.

The Power of Suggestion. A word about the denial that many of us live in with respect to software development.

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